Lesson Category: Decision-Making and Problem-Solving

Inspirational Thought: Andrew Hill

“Another aspect of the leader’s difficult role is that there can be only one clear leader of the group, and that person must be willing to accept responsibility for the actions of all.” Andrew Hill

Growth Activity #3: Metaphor

Two Growth Activities   Metaphor In this section we introduced a couple of ideas around analogies and metaphors, such as “Think like a Fan or Think Like a Coach. What metaphors or analogies can you develop to help you in your ability to communicate more effectively throughout the problem-solving process? Chernobyl What is the most …

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Problem-Solving Framework

Problem-solving is exhilarating, frustrating, entertaining, aggravating, rewarding, and sometimes discouraging. As with most leadership and management practices, there are many possible techniques that can be used to structure a problem-solving process. We focus on simplicity and leveraging a person’s instinctive logical thinking processes. We do not encourage a person to memorize a technique. Rather, we …

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Use Analogies

The use of analogies and metaphors is a highly useful way to frame a problem and explore a solution. Analogies and metaphors give us working models that we can visualize in our minds. That visualization stimulates creativity and innovation and we begin to see possibilities emerge for a difficult problem. https://vimeo.com/350617128/d4b56539ab

Inspirational Thought: C. S. Forester

“Horatio Hornblower began to feel that life in the Navy, although it seemed to move from one crisis to another, was really one continuous crisis, that even while dealing with one emergency it was necessary to be making plans to deal with the next.” C. S. Forester Mr. Midshipman Hornblower

Growth Activity #2: What Change Can You Make

Review the “Road to Abilene” story in Groupthink. Have you ever been on the proverbial “Road to Abilene?” What happened to cause you to take that trip? What were the warning signs you could have foreseen? If you could do it over again, what would you have done as a leader to prevent the trip?

The Underside of Command

This case study is based on decision-making that occurred during the Battle of Gettysburg. The case was written by the Founder of Leaders247 Gordon Whitehead, and was developed from the historical fiction novel The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara. The case examines a common situation that happens to subordinate leaders when they are wedged between two different …

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